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The Custom

In the dry climate of ancient Greece, water was prized above all. Giving up water from one's own body, when crying tears for the dead, was considered a sacrifice. They caught their precious tears in tiny pitchers or "tear jars." The tears became holy water and could be used to sprinkle on doorways to keep out evil, or to cool the brow of a sick child.

This ancient custom was believed to soothe or comfort people who have grieved deeply. The action of placing the tears on one who was in sorrow or pain was believed to help bring about a transformation to that person.

Interestingly, very similar customs are known among the Etruscans, Romans and other ancient cultures. In fact, related customs were practiced by some in the English Victorian society.

The Synopsis

Seasoned, itinerant blues man, Mason Ball, returns to The Blue Rose, a club in which he enjoys playing. He's also returning to see, Savannah,  the owner he deeply 'admires.'

Upon his arrival, he's surprised to discover that a 'new kid in town' has claimed the stage and attention of an appreciative audience. This young upstart, JD Hunter, is unwilling to relinquish the limelight and makes it clear that the 'old blues' are dead.

To add to the tension, Mason's private love interest shares with him a serious, personal loss. Frustrated with his inability to appease her emotional pain, Mason dips his finger into a jar of tears given him by his recently departed mother and touches her with the potion.

This act, apparently, manifests in wondrous results... relieving her of her anguish. Mason doubts his healing powers, yet can't dismiss the changes he seems to have made. When word gets out, the audience demands Mason's appearance onstage and seem to come for his 'gift of healing' as much as his gift of song.

JD challenges Mason's abilities, those both spiritual and musical. When a plan to expose Mason backfires, JD Hunter learns what it's like to be on the receiving end of 'the gift.'